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B Star Rotational Velocities in h and χ Persei: A Probe of Initial Conditions during the Star Formation Epoch?
Projected rotational velocities (vsini) have been measured for 216 B0-B9stars in the rich, dense h and χ Persei double cluster and comparedwith the distribution of rotational velocities for a sample of fieldstars having comparable ages (t~12-15 Myr) and masses (M~4-15Msolar). For stars that are relatively little evolved fromtheir initial locations on the zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) (those withmasses M~4-5 Msolar), the mean vsini measured for the h andχ Per sample is slightly more than 2 times larger than the meandetermined for field stars of comparable mass, and the cluster and fieldvsini distributions differ with a high degree of significance. Forsomewhat more evolved stars with masses in the range 5-9Msolar, the mean vsini in h and χ Per is 1.5 times thatof the field; the vsini distributions differ as well, but with a lowerdegree of statistical significance. For stars that have evolvedsignificantly from the ZAMS and are approaching the hydrogen exhaustionphase (those with masses in the range 9-15 Msolar), thecluster and field star means and distributions are only slightlydifferent. We argue that both the higher rotation rates and the patternof rotation speeds as a function of mass that differentiatemain-sequence B stars in h and χ Per from their field analogs werelikely imprinted during the star formation process rather than a resultof angular momentum evolution over the 12-15 Myr cluster lifetime. Wespeculate that these differences may reflect the effects of the higheraccretion rates that theory suggests are characteristic of regions thatgive birth to dense clusters, namely, (1) higher initial rotationspeeds; (2) higher initial radii along the stellar birth line, resultingin greater spin-up between the birth line and the ZAMS; and (3) a morepronounced maximum in the birth line radius-mass relationship thatresults in differentially greater spin-up for stars that become mid- tolate-B stars on the ZAMS.

Rotational Velocities of B Stars
We measured the projected rotational velocities of 1092 northern B starslisted in the Bright Star Catalogue (BSC) and calibrated them againstthe 1975 Slettebak et al. system. We found that the published values ofB dwarfs in the BSC average 27% higher than those standards. Only 0.3%of the stars have rotational velocities in excess of two-thirds of thebreakup velocities, and the mean velocity is only 25% of breakup,implying that impending breakup is not a significant factor in reducingrotational velocities. For the B8-B9.5 III-V stars the bimodaldistribution in V can be explained by a set of slowly rotating Ap starsand a set of rapidly rotating normal stars. For the B0-B5 III-V starsthat include very few peculiar stars, the distributions in V are notbimodal. Are the low rotational velocities of B stars due to theoccurrence of frequent low-mass companions, planets, or disks? Therotational velocities of giants originating from late B dwarfs areconsistent with their conservation of angular momentum in shells.However, we are puzzled by why the giants that originate from the earlyB dwarfs, despite having 3 times greater radii, have nearly the samerotational velocities. We find that all B-type primaries in binarieswith periods less than 2.4 days have synchronized rotational and orbitalmotions; those with periods between 2.4 and 5.0 days are rotating withina factor 2 of synchronization or are ``nearly synchronized.'' Thecorresponding period ranges for A-type stars are 4.9 and 10.5 days, ortwice as large. We found that the rotational velocities of the primariesare synchronized earlier than their orbits are circularized. The maximumorbital period for circularized B binaries is 1.5 days and for Abinaries is 2.5 days. For stars of various ages from 107.5 to1010.2 yr the maximum circularized periods are a smoothexponential function of age.

Astrometric radial velocities. III. Hipparcos measurements of nearby star clusters and associations
Radial motions of stars in nearby moving clusters are determined fromaccurate proper motions and trigonometric parallaxes, without any use ofspectroscopy. Assuming that cluster members share the same velocityvector (apart from a random dispersion), we apply a maximum-likelihoodmethod on astrometric data from Hipparcos to compute radial and spacevelocities (and their dispersions) in the Ursa Major, Hyades, ComaBerenices, Pleiades, and Praesepe clusters, and for theScorpius-Centaurus, alpha Persei, and ``HIP 98321'' associations. Theradial motion of the Hyades cluster is determined to within 0.4 kms-1 (standard error), and that of its individual stars towithin 0.6 km s-1. For other clusters, Hipparcos data yieldastrometric radial velocities with typical accuracies of a few kms-1. A comparison of these astrometric values withspectroscopic radial velocities in the literature shows a good generalagreement and, in the case of the best-determined Hyades cluster, alsopermits searches for subtle astrophysical differences, such as evidencefor enhanced convective blueshifts of F-dwarf spectra, and decreasedgravitational redshifts in giants. Similar comparisons for the ScorpiusOB2 complex indicate some expansion of its associations, albeit slowerthan expected from their ages. As a by-product from the radial-velocitysolutions, kinematically improved parallaxes for individual stars areobtained, enabling Hertzsprung-Russell diagrams with unprecedentedaccuracy in luminosity. For the Hyades (parallax accuracy 0.3 mas), itsmain sequence resembles a thin line, possibly with wiggles in it.Although this main sequence has underpopulated regions at certaincolours (previously suggested to be ``Böhm-Vitense gaps''), suchare not visible for other clusters, and are probably spurious. Futurespace astrometry missions carry a great potential for absoluteradial-velocity determinations, insensitive to the complexities ofstellar spectra. Based on observations by the ESA Hipparcos satellite.Extended versions of Tables \ref{tab1} and \ref{tab2} are available inelectronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr(130.79.125.8) or viahttp://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/381/446

Statistical analysis of intrinsic polarization, IR excess and projected rotational velocity distributions of classical Be stars
We present the results of statistical analyses of a sample of 627 Bestars. The parameters of intrinsic polarization (p*),projected rotational velocity (v sin i), and near IR excesses have beeninvestigated. The values of p* have been estimated for a muchlarger and more representative sample of Be stars (~490 objects) thanpreviously. We have confirmed that most Be stars of early spectral typehave statistically larger values of polarization and IR excesses incomparison with the late spectral type stars. It is found that thedistributions of p* diverge considerably for the differentspectral subgroups. In contrast to late spectral types (B5-B9.5), thedistribution of p* for B0-B2 stars does not peak at the valuep*=0%. Statistically significant differences in the meanprojected rotational velocities (/line{vsin i}) are found for differentspectral subgroups of Be stars in the sense that late spectral typestars (V luminosity class) generally rotate faster than early types, inagreement with previously published results. This behaviour is, however,not obvious for the III-IV luminosity class stars. Nevertheless, thecalculated values of the ratio vt/vc of the truerotational velocity, vt, to the critical velocity forbreak-up, vc, is larger for late spectral type stars of allluminosity classes. Thus, late spectral type stars appear to rotatecloser to their break-up rotational velocity. The distribution of nearIR excesses for early spectral subgroups is bi-modal, the position ofthe second peak displaying a maximum value E(V-L)~ 1 . m 3for O-B1.5 stars, decreasing to E(V-L)~0. m8 for intermediatespectral types (B3-B5). It is shown that bi-modality disappears for latespectral types (B6-B9.5). No correlations were found betweenp* and near IR excesses and between E(V-L) and vsin i for thedifferent subgroups of Be stars. In contrast to near IR excesses, arelation between p* and far IR excesses at 12 mu m is clearlyseen. A clear relation between p* and vsin i (as well asbetween p* and /line{vsin i}/vc) is found by thefact that plots of these parameters are bounded by a ``triangular"distribution of p*: vsin i, with a decrease of p*towards very small and very large vsin i (and /line{vsini}/vc) values. The latter behaviour can be understood in thecontext of a larger oblateness of circumstellar disks for the stars witha rapid rotation. From the analysis of correlations between differentobservational parameters we conclude that circumstellar envelopes forthe majority of Be stars are optically thin disks with the range of thehalf-opening angle of 10degr

Catalogue of Apparent Diameters and Absolute Radii of Stars (CADARS) - Third edition - Comments and statistics
The Catalogue, available at the Centre de Données Stellaires deStrasbourg, consists of 13 573 records concerning the results obtainedfrom different methods for 7778 stars, reported in the literature. Thefollowing data are listed for each star: identifications, apparentmagnitude, spectral type, apparent diameter in arcsec, absolute radiusin solar units, method of determination, reference, remarks. Commentsand statistics obtained from CADARS are given. The Catalogue isavailable in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp tocdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or viahttp://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcar?J/A+A/367/521

OB association members in the ACT and TRC catalogues
The Hipparcos Catalogue contains members of nearby OB associationsbrighter than 12th magnitude in V. However, membership lists arecomplete only to magnitude V=7.3. In this paper we discuss whetherproper motions listed in the `Astrographic Catalogue+Tycho' referencecatalogue (ACT) and the Tycho Reference Catalogue (TRC), which arecomplete to V~10.5mag, can be used to find additional associationmembers. Proper motions in the ACT/TRC have an average accuracy of~3masyr-1. We search for ACT/TRC stars which have propermotions consistent with the spatial velocity of the Hipparcos members ofthe nearby OB associations already identified by de Zeeuw et al. Thesestars are first selected using a convergent-point method, and thensubjected to further constraints on the proper-motion distribution,magnitude and colour to narrow down the final number of candidatemembers. Monte Carlo simulations show that the proper-motiondistribution, magnitude, and colour constraints remove ~97per cent ofthe field stars, while at the same time retain more than 90per cent ofthe cluster stars. The procedure has been applied to five nearbyassociations: the three subgroups of Sco OB2, plus Per OB3 and Cep OB6.In all cases except Cep OB6, we find evidence for new associationmembers fainter than the completeness limit of the Hipparcos Catalogue.However, narrow-band photometry and/or radial velocities are needed topinpoint the cluster members, and to study their physicalcharacteristics.

A HIPPARCOS Census of the Nearby OB Associations
A comprehensive census of the stellar content of the OB associationswithin 1 kpc from the Sun is presented, based on Hipparcos positions,proper motions, and parallaxes. It is a key part of a long-term projectto study the formation, structure, and evolution of nearby young stellargroups and related star-forming regions. OB associations are unbound``moving groups,'' which can be detected kinematically because of theirsmall internal velocity dispersion. The nearby associations have a largeextent on the sky, which traditionally has limited astrometricmembership determination to bright stars (V<~6 mag), with spectraltypes earlier than ~B5. The Hipparcos measurements allow a majorimprovement in this situation. Moving groups are identified in theHipparcos Catalog by combining de Bruijne's refurbished convergent pointmethod with the ``Spaghetti method'' of Hoogerwerf & Aguilar.Astrometric members are listed for 12 young stellar groups, out to adistance of ~650 pc. These are the three subgroups Upper Scorpius, UpperCentaurus Lupus, and Lower Centaurus Crux of Sco OB2, as well as VelOB2, Tr 10, Col 121, Per OB2, alpha Persei (Per OB3), Cas-Tau, Lac OB1,Cep OB2, and a new group in Cepheus, designated as Cep OB6. Theselection procedure corrects the list of previously known astrometricand photometric B- and A-type members in these groups and identifiesmany new members, including a significant number of F stars, as well asevolved stars, e.g., the Wolf-Rayet stars gamma^2 Vel (WR 11) in Vel OB2and EZ CMa (WR 6) in Col 121, and the classical Cepheid delta Cep in CepOB6. Membership probabilities are given for all selected stars. MonteCarlo simulations are used to estimate the expected number of interloperfield stars. In the nearest associations, notably in Sco OB2, thelater-type members include T Tauri objects and other stars in the finalpre-main-sequence phase. This provides a firm link between the classicalhigh-mass stellar content and ongoing low-mass star formation. Detailedstudies of these 12 groups, and their relation to the surroundinginterstellar medium, will be presented elsewhere. Astrometric evidencefor moving groups in the fields of R CrA, CMa OB1, Mon OB1, Ori OB1, CamOB1, Cep OB3, Cep OB4, Cyg OB4, Cyg OB7, and Sct OB2, is inconclusive.OB associations do exist in many of these regions, but they are eitherat distances beyond ~500 pc where the Hipparcos parallaxes are oflimited use, or they have unfavorable kinematics, so that the groupproper motion does not distinguish it from the field stars in theGalactic disk. The mean distances of the well-established groups aresystematically smaller than the pre-Hipparcos photometric estimates.While part of this may be caused by the improved membership lists, arecalibration of the upper main sequence in the Hertzsprung-Russelldiagram may be called for. The mean motions display a systematicpattern, which is discussed in relation to the Gould Belt. Six of the 12detected moving groups do not appear in the classical list of nearby OBassociations. This is sometimes caused by the absence of O stars, but inother cases a previously known open cluster turns out to be (part of) anextended OB association. The number of unbound young stellar groups inthe solar neighborhood may be significantly larger than thoughtpreviously.

Open clusters with Hipparcos. I. Mean astrometric parameters
New memberships, mean parallaxes and proper motions of all 9 openclusters closer than 300 pc (except the Hyades) and 9rich clusters between 300 and 500 pc have been computed using Hipparcosdata. Precisions, ranging from 0.2 to 0.5 mas for parallaxes and 0.1 to0.5 mas/yr for proper motions, are of great interest for calibratingphotometric parallaxes as well as for kinematical studies. Carefulinvestigations of possible biases have been performed and no evidence ofsignificant systematic errors on the mean cluster parallaxes has beenfound. The distances and proper motions of 32 more distant clusters,which may be used statistically, are also indicated. Based onobservations made with the ESA Hipparcos astrometry satellite

The Pleiades and alpha Persei Clusters
The upper-main-sequence members of the Pleiades and alpha Perseiclusters, considered as members of the Local Association, yield meanparallaxes that are only 4% larger than the mean values from Hipparcosobservations. The (log T_eff, M_V) diagram reveals that in thetemperature range from 6000 to 8000 K, the Hyades and alpha Perseimain-sequence members are nearly identical and several tenths of amagnitude brighter than similar stars on the Pleiades main sequence. Thedeparture of the Pleiades main sequence cannot be traced to either ageor heavy-element abundance differences in the range thought to apply tothese clusters. A 50% increase in the helium abundance of Pleiades overHyades stars could account for the luminosity difference. Alternativeexplanations are that the Pleiades cluster is rejected from superclustermembership and/or that the Hipparcos parallax results for the Pleiadesare in error by some 10%.

Long-term visual spectrophotometric behaviour of Be stars
The long-term spectrophotometric variations of 49 Be stars are studiedusing the U and V magnitudes of the UBV system, the total Balmerdiscontinuity D and the visible gradient Phi _rb. BCD spectrophotometricand photometric data in five different photometric systems, obtained inmost cases since 1950 and reduced to the BCD system, were used. The(U,D), (V,D), (Phi _rb,D) and (Phi _rb,V) correlations obtained differfrom star to star and they can be single or double-valued. They differclearly for Be phases or Be-shell phases. Be stars with small Vsin ishowing the ``spectrophotometric shell behaviour'': D > D_*, werefound. This finding implies either that strongly flattened models ofcircumstellar envelopes are in doubt for these stars, or that not all Bestars are rapid rotators. Comparison of observed variations with thosepredicted for model Be stars with spherical circumstellar envelopes ofvariable densities and dimensions implies that spectrophotometricpatterns of Be phases are due to circumstellar envelopes in low opacityregimes, while those of spectrophotometric shell phases are due tocircumstellar envelopes in high opacity regimes. In a given star, theenvelope regions responsible for the observed variations of D and Phi_rbin spectrophotometric shell phases seem to be smaller and denser thanthose producing the observed variations of these parameters inspectrophotometric Be phases. The high positive RV found in strong shellphases might favor the formation of compact circumstellar layers nearthe star. Figure 6 is only available in electronic form at CDS viaanonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or viahttp://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/Abstract.html

ROSAT Pointed Observations of the Alpha Persei Cluster
Abstract image available at:http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-bib_query?1996AJ....112.1570P&db_key=AST

The ROSAT all-sky survey catalogue of optically bright OB-type stars.
For the detailed statistical analysis of the X-ray emission of hot starswe selected all stars of spectral type O and B listed in the Yale BrightStar Catalogue and searched for them in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey. Inthis paper we describe the selection and preparation of the data andpresent a compilation of the derived X-ray data for a complete sample ofbright OB stars.

The photoelectric astrolabe catalogue of Yunnan Observatory (YPAC).
The positions of 53 FK5, 70 FK5 Extension and 486 GC stars are given forthe equator and equinox J2000.0 and for the mean observation epoch ofeach star. They are determined with the photoelectric astrolabe ofYunnan Observatory. The internal mean errors in right ascension anddeclination are +/- 0.046" and +/- 0.059", respectively. The meanobservation epoch is 1989.51.

Far-Ultraviolet (912--1900 Angstrom ) Energy Distribution in Early-Type Main-Sequence Stars
Abstract image available at:http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-bib_query?1995ApJ...449..280C&db_key=AST

A cold massive interstellar cloud within 120 parsecs of the Sun: K I optical and H I radio observations
We first discovered the presence of a particularly massive cloud in theneighborhood of the Sun, close to the Galactic plane in the direction ofPerseus, toward l = 150 deg, b = -10 deg, using interstellar absorptionby the 7699 A resonance line of K I (Trapero et al. 1992). In thepresent investigation we show the results of mapping the cloud in the 21cm line of H I, supplemented by further K I observations. Thiscombination is particularly effective, since the K I observations giveus distances, within close limits, and accurate velocities of the singlestrong interstellar component detected along each line of sight, whichenables us to identify the cloud as seen in absorption in the H Ispectra, from among many emission components due to more distant cloudsin the plane. The absorption spectra in H I at 21 cm can then be used tofind temperatures and to carry out more comprehensive mapping than usingK I. We find that the cloud has kinetic temperatures going down to 30 K,densitites in the range up to 70/cu cm, a diameter of approximately 15pc, and a mass of some 1300 solar mass. The cloud is a good candidate tocontain a molecular core.

Vitesses radiales. Catalogue WEB: Wilson Evans Batten. Subtittle: Radial velocities: The Wilson-Evans-Batten catalogue.
We give a common version of the two catalogues of Mean Radial Velocitiesby Wilson (1963) and Evans (1978) to which we have added the catalogueof spectroscopic binary systems (Batten et al. 1989). For each star,when possible, we give: 1) an acronym to enter SIMBAD (Set ofIdentifications Measurements and Bibliography for Astronomical Data) ofthe CDS (Centre de Donnees Astronomiques de Strasbourg). 2) the numberHIC of the HIPPARCOS catalogue (Turon 1992). 3) the CCDM number(Catalogue des Composantes des etoiles Doubles et Multiples) byDommanget & Nys (1994). For the cluster stars, a precise study hasbeen done, on the identificator numbers. Numerous remarks point out theproblems we have had to deal with.

Seven-Color Photoelectric Photometry of Stars in the Alpha-Persei Open Cluster
Not Available

Spectroscopic binaries in the Alpha Persei cluster
An average of 16 radial velocity measures for each of the 28 brightest(B3-A2) cluster members and found four binaries was obtained. Theresulting binary frequency of 14 percent is, like the previous 20percent for the B6-A1 stars in the Pleiades, unusually low compared witha typical 30 percent for early-type field stars or with 30 percent ormore in other open clusters. These two clusters are the only known oneswith unusually high mean rotational velocities. It is suspected that themean rotational velocities are high either because these clusters lackshort-period binaries or are not old enough for synchronization ofrotational and orbital velocities to have occurred. The four AlphaPersei binaries are all relatively wide ones (greater than 20 d) andwith small mass ratios (0.1-0.5). The same results apply to the youngOrion Nebula cluster. These results can be explained in terms of theformation of binaries by capture in that during the first free-falltime, capture will produce wide binaries with small mass ratios, as inthe Orion Nebula and Alpha Persei clusters, but repeated captures anddisruptions will produce more closely spaced binaries with many massratios near 1.0, as in IC 4665.

Membership of low-mass stars in the open cluster Alpha Persei
The results of a combined astrometric, photometric, and spectroscopicsearch for low-mass members in the intermediate-age open cluster AlphaPersei are presented. Over 130 low-mass new members have been identifiedto M(v) about 12.5, almost doubling the previous number of knownmembers. The new membership information suggests a slight upwardrevision of Alpha Per's age to about 8 x 10 exp 7 yr. Alpha Per isnoticeably spatially elongated in a direction parallel to the Galacticplane, most likely due to tidal deformation. Analysis of thedistribution of relative H-alpha emission strengths among Alpha Permembers confirms the view that the mean H-alpha strength decreases inincreasingly older systems. Allowing for survey incompleteness, onecannot reject the idea that the luminosity function is consistent withthe field luminosity function to M(v) about 9 or 10.

Extinction law survey based on UV ANS photometry
The paper presents an extensive survey of interstellar extinction curvesderived from the ANS photometric measurements of early type starsbelonging to our Galaxy. This survey is more extensive and deeper thanany other one, based on spectral data. The UV color excesses aredetermined with the aid of 'artificial standards', a new techniqueproposed by the authors which allows the special check of Sp/L match ofa target and the selected standard. The results indicate that extinctionlaw changes from place to place.

The surface-brightness method and the dependence of the bolometric correction on star effective temperature.
Not Available

Absolute magnitudes of B emission line stars - Correlation between the luminosity excess and the effective temperature
A new determination of the visual absolute magnitude of Be stars iscarried out. For this, a new calibration of visual absolute magnitudesof B stars of luminosity classes, V, IV, and III is first obtained froma sample of 215 stars. The absolute luminosity excess in the visual isdetermined for a sample of 49 Be stars. It is found that this excess iscorrelated with the effective temperature of the underlying stars. Awell defined correlation between this excess and the emission in thefirst two Balmer lines is established. From these results, using asimple model of circumstellar envelope, it is inferred that the zones ofthe circumstellar envelope contributing to the emission in the continuumand in the lines have to be rather small. It is also deduced that theemission measure of the envelope is correlated with the temperature ofthe central star and that the irregular photometric variations of Bestars are an envelope-opacity phenomenon.

The frequency and formation mechanism of B2-B5 main-sequence binaries
Twenty coude spectra were obtained for each of the 74 B2-B5 IV or Vstars, and the results of their radial velocities were combined withthose of a previous study of 42 similar stars, to examine the frequencyand the formation mechanism of these binaries. New improved orbitalelements are listed for nine known double-lined and 26 single-linedspectroscopic binaries. It is found that, systems with periods of 0.01yr to 100,000 yrs, have secondary frequencies that fit the Salpeter(1955) luminosity function (but not the van Rhijn function), indicatingthat these systems were formed primarily by capture. For systems withperiods shorter than 0.01 yr, the separations of components are only afew stellar radii, suggesting that these systems have undergone masstransfer; their secondary masses have no direct information concerningthe formation mechanism.

Luminosities, masses, and ages of B-type stars
Measurements of H-gamma lines and photometry of the Balmer discontinuityare combined with models of stellar atmospheres and interiors to derivevalues of T(eff) log g, mass, and M(bol) for main-sequence B-type starsin the Alpha Per and the Pleiades clusters and in the Orion, Sco-Gen,and I Lac associations. The masses as a function of T(eff) agree withthe analyses of eclipsing binary orbits. The luminosities yielddistances for the observed clusters and associations that are in goodagreement with independent determinations. The observed main sequence isbroader than predicted by standard models and suggests that mixing mayplay a role in extending the main-sequence lifetime. Stars within eachcluster and association show a range of ages, a result that suggeststhat star formation occurred over a period of at least 1-3 x 10 to the7th yr.

Empirical temperature calibrations for early-type stars
Three temperature calibrations of suitable photometric quantities havebeen derived for O and B stars. A sample of 120 stars with reliableT(eff.) determinations has been used for establishing each calibration.The different calibrations have been critically discussed and compared.Temperature determinations for 1009 program stars have been obtainedwith an accuracy of the order of 10 percent.

Effects of rotation on the colours and line indices of stars. I - The Alpha Persei Cluster
Analysis of the available observational data for the Alpha-Perseicluster members shows that rotation effects on the intermediate-bandindices c1 and (u-b) are considerable. In c1, rotation produces areddening of 0.040 magnitudes per 100 km/s. In (u-b), the effect for Bstars is found to be 0.06 magnitudes per 100 km/s of V sin i. Thebinaries and peculiar stars are found to behave differently in the colorexcess (due to rotation) versus V sin i diagrams. These empiricaleffects can be utilized to recalibrate these color indices and also toseparate members that are either chemically peculiar or in binarysystems.

Merged log of IUE observations.
Not Available

Starbursts, binary stars, and blue stragglers in local superclusters and groups. I - The very young disk and young disk populations
The distributions in the HR diagram with theoretical time-constant locifor stars in several young clusters and superclusters are compared todemonstrate that 'blue stragglers' in these aggregates are mostfrequently simply single massive (mode B) stars formed in bursts of starformation that occur at discrete intervals in time following theformation of the bulk of the low-mass (mode A) stars in the aggregate.The characteristics of the close binary systems in these aggregates areexamined to show that, in several cases, mass transfer by Roche lobeoverflow has or will occur and that, in some instances, the system wouldhave appeared as a blue straggler prior to the mass-transfer event, and,in other instances, mass transfer will lead to the identification of thesystem as a blue straggler. Thus, it is concluded that the bluestraggler phenomenon has at least two distinct physical origins: it mayoriginate from delayed formation (starbursts) or from 'delayedevolution' in some close binaries (mass transfer from an evolvedprimary).

Interdependence of the 4430 A diffuse interstellar band, polarization, and ultraviolet extinction
Central intensities of the 4430-A diffuse interstellar band (DIB) areobtained from reticon spectra of 128 early-type stars, and stars in thePerseus OB1 association are found to have higher ratios of polarizationand weaker 4430-A intensities than do the stars in Cepheus OB3. Thecorrelation noted for OB1 between the A(4430) residuals and E(15-18) canbe explained if the 4430-A DIB arises in a thin grain mantle and the2200-A feature arises in the grain core. The absence of a 4430-A DIB inhigh-Galactic-latitude clouds would then be due to a lack of mantle. TheDIB ratio 5780/5797 A is found to resemble the behavior of the(4430-A)/E(B-V) ratio for seven stars from a range of Galacticlatitudes, confirming the existence of three previously identifiedfamilies of DIBs.

Photoelectric search for CP2-stars in open clusters. XII - Alpha Persei, Praesepe and NGC 7243
Observations of 95 stars in the open clusters Alpha Persei, Praesepe,and NGC 7243 have been performed by Delta-a photometry in order tosearch for the presence of the 5200-A feature of CP2 (or CP4) stars.Although peculiarity has been claimed for half a dozen stars in AlphaPersei, the photometry detects only the CP4 star (= He-weak) HL 985among the cluster members. The behavior of 3 Be/shell stars (HL 861,1164, 904) concerning the 5200-A feature is discussed. Praesepe, by farthe oldest cluster in the survey program, presents a very new andspecial case: 3 stars, previously classified as Am have Delta-a valuesaround 0.020 mag, i.e., they exhibit photometric peculiarity likeCP2-stars. Such values are incompatible with preceding results for fieldand cluster Am-stars (= CP3). These objects deserve further attentionboth photometrically and spectroscopically. NGC 7243 exhibits anoutstanding high frequency of CP2-stars; two certain Delta a-peculiarstars have been found: L 370, already known as peculiar, and the newlyidentified L 114. Two stars are near the detection level: L 58 and 121.According to Geneva photometry, L 487 is markedly peculiar.

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Observation and Astrometry data

Constellation:Perseus
Right ascension:03h19m07.60s
Declination:+50°05'42.0"
Apparent magnitude:5.03
Distance:147.493 parsecs
Proper motion RA:21.9
Proper motion Dec:-26.3
B-T magnitude:4.947
V-T magnitude:5.021

Catalogs and designations:
Proper Names   (Edit)
Flamsteed31 Per
HD 1989HD 20418
TYCHO-2 2000TYC 3319-2074-1
USNO-A2.0USNO-A2 1350-03292517
BSC 1991HR 989
HIPHIP 15444

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